The Adventure:

Get a big, fat, juicy burger from the proclaimed best burger joint in town: 2 Doors Down

The Contender:

A girl who definitely holds her own on contributing to the number of burgers eaten in America per year.

The Experience:

The sun was shining.
The birds were chirping.
The mittens and scarves were stuffed in the trunk in my closet. 
It was supposed to be 70-degrees today.
Spring had sprung!

That is until a fellow Cheyenne amiga shared we were forecast to get 2 feet of snow this weekend. 

That's plural people. Feet.

That's taller than Dizzy kind of snow. TALLER THAN MY 50-POUND PIT BULL KIND OF SNOW.

That news, in combination with the fact that it was only Thursday, and definitely did not feel like "almost Friday", led me to believe I needed to stuff my face and destroy my healthy eating habit in one fell swoop by seeking out the best of my favorite fast food item.

Lunch time came around and I found myself saying "Whoa!" at the line of people nearly spilling out the front door of 2 Doors Down ... and this is just one of their two locations. The downtown location was opened in 2009 by Cheyenne natives and veteran restaurant owners, Jerry + Sandy Inniss. 

Fast-forward many years, to me (not) patiently standing in the line stretched across the windows in the entrance of 2 Doors Down. A server scans the line for any newcomers to explain you can order both burgers and fries from 2 Doors Down AND any assortment of Italian items from Piccolo Venti, the Inniss' other restaurant, which used to be located just two doors down. 

At 2 Doors Down, you order your food at a front counter before choosing a seat to have your food delivered to. Think Noodles + Company style. The main dining area is a deep and far-stretching room paneled with dark wood floors, brick walls, and twinkle lights strung above you. I love any place with twinkle lights. Straight-backed booths are placed throughout the dining room and bright green metal tables are seated outside. And no one was sitting outside! 

After ordering their most popular burger (Avocado Bacon Burger), confirming that I would like Ranch with my fries (Midwestern girl!), and choosing their shake of the month (Caramel Apple Shake) I plopped myself (quite literally) in the sunniest spot outside as Waterloo was playing over the radio. 

Truth time: I have been to 2 Doors Down a handful of times before. Including the world's shortest 30th birthday dinner in the history of 30th birthday dinners. 

The food is always good and it is always fast (don't let the long line scare you). Their staff are attentive and the whole vibe of the place is perfect for lunch - casual, bright, and fresh. 

And if you're not in the burger mood, they have plenty of other options that I would imagine are just as scrumptious. I've just never tried anything else because burgers


Wyoming State Archives

The 17th Street location is nestled between Warren and Central Avenues and is placed on the same corner The Cheyenne Club stood in 1880. During that era, Cheyenne was viewed as one of the wealthiest cities per capita as it was conveniently located on the transcontinental railroad system. The gentleman's club was established by 12 cattlemen and was built to contain two grand staircases, tennis courts, reading rooms, billiard and smoking rooms, and wine vaults. The sleeping quarters on the top floor were paneled with hardwood floors and Turkish carpets. Fireplaces within the building were tiled to feature various Shakespeare quotes. The clubhouse, built on one-and-a-half city lots, was limited to 200 members and rules were established in order to maintain small corner of civilization in this otherwise Wild West area: no wagering, no games on Sundays, no smoking after 7:30pm, no cheating, no cursing, no drunkenness. The Club eventually shut its doors when disastrous winters drove its wealthy members to new locations. The building became the Club of Cheyenne boasting a much larger, but less exclusive membership, which eventually evolved into the Industrial Club and then the home of the Cheyenne Chamber of Commerce. In 1936, the building was torn down completely and a new Chamber building was constructed in its place.